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GIS at UCD and on the Web: Maps with Contours

UCD Library GIS Guide

View Contours via GeoHive

Irish maps which show contour lines

A contour is a line on a map that connects points of equal elevation and is usually based on height above sea level.

 

Extract from Military Series Map - Howth Sheet 32/23 S.W. showing contours at intervals of 50, 100, 200, etc.,feet

 

Index to the Military Maps GSGS 3906. Online seamless access to the GSGS 3906 series is available via OpenStreetMap.These military maps were reproduced in the 1940s in Great Britain by the War Office at a scale of 1:25,000 but derived from 1:10,560 county maps published between 1895 - 1918. Most sheets are composites of four six inch maps, photographically reduced with the contours overprinted.

List of the Military Maps GSGS 3906 Series These maps are held in Richview Library and also in the GPEP Map Library

 

Extract from Discovery Series map showing contour lines along the Kerry Way

 

Discovery Series maps are published at a scale of 1:50,000.

Contours are shown at intervals of 10 and 50 metres. 

Altitudes are given in metres above Mean Sea Level at Malin Head, Co Donegal.

These maps also show spot heights.

To obtain free Discovery mapping tiles in vector format please refer to the Free OSi Data page

 

Extract from OS 6inch map showing Glendalough

1:10,560 Ordnance Survey maps (six inch to 1 mile). Maps at this scale are available for the whole of Ireland but have not been updated since the 1930s. For more information about this series see Trinity Map Library's guide. Altitudes are given in feet and contours are shown at intervals of 50, 100, 200, etc. Some editions show the contour lines in red.

 

Extract from Dublin sheet 12 @ five feet to one mile 1847 map showing Temple Street West

 

Dublin 5 feet to 1 mile maps These maps which show contour lines are included in the Ordnance Survey Ireland (OSi) 19th Century Historical Maps online digital collection and are therefore available to view and take prints from. Two editions were published - one in 1843 and the other in 1864.There are 33 maps in each edition covering the area between the canals.